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Writing a "Showing" Paragraph

Minilesson Print

Writing a "Showing" Paragraph

A GROUP OF MEN AND WOMEN, WITH A GUIDE, WHITEWATER RAFTING ON THE PATATE RIVER, ECUADOR
Ammit Jack/Shutterstock.com

When you write to "show" instead of "tell," you use sensory details so that readers can see, hear, smell, taste, and touch the experience for themselves. Read the paragraph below. Then check the sensory chart to see the details that make this description vivid.

Showing Paragraph

The rumbling grew as our raft bobbed toward the drop in the river. The air moistened and smelled of morning dew. Ahead of us, copper water plunged down a set of boiling rapids, which carved their curving way among jagged cliffs. My mouth went dry with a tang of fear. “Hold on, everybody!” I shouted.

Sensory Details

Sight

Sound

Smell

Taste

Touch

Copper water

Curving river

Jagged cliffs

Rumbling

Boiling

“Hold on, everybody!”

Morning dew

Tang of fear

Bobbing raft

Moist air

Dry mouth

Your Turn Create your own sensory chart and fill it with sensory details about your surroundings. (You can also download the sensory chart template and fill it in.) Then write a paragraph using the sensory details to describe your surroundings.

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