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Teacher Tips and Answers

Writing a Narrative Paragraph

Once you finish prewriting, you are ready to write your paragraph. These writing activities will help you create a topic sentence, body sentences, and an ending sentence. You'll also read another student's paragraph to see how all of the parts came together.

Writing the Topic Sentence

Your narrative paragraph should begin with a topic sentence. It names the topic and shares a specific thought or feeling about it.

Sample Topic Sentence 1:

Whitewater rafting with my family was a crazy adventure.

  • Topic: Whitewater rafting with my family
  • Special Thought: A crazy adventure

Sample Topic Sentence 2:

I’ll never forget the time I saw the playful polar bear.

  • Topic: The playful polar bear
  • Special Feeling: Never forget seeing it

Write your topic sentence.

Respond to the first two items below, and use your responses to help you write a topic sentence for your narrative paragraph. Make a copy of this Google doc or download a Word template.

  1. Name your topic.

    My first seashell hunt

  2. Share a specific thought or feeling about it.

    A surprise ending

  3. Write your topic sentence.

    My first seashell hunt had a surprise ending.

Writing the Body Sentences

Body sentences are the middle part of a paragraph. They tell what happened in your story in time order. Body sentences may also include details about the setting as well as conversations between characters.

Write body sentences.

Write body sentences that tell what happened in your story. Include some sensory details to help recreate the experience. Examples of sensory details are given below. Make a copy of this Google doc or download a Word template.

Sensory Details

Sights

shiny red bucket

Sounds

crack and boom of fireworks

Smells

fishy ocean stench

Tastes

sweet juicy strawberries

Touch

sharp poke of a needle

Sights
shiny red bucket

Sounds
crack and boom of fireworks

Smells
fishy ocean stench

Tastes
sweet juicy strawberries

Touch
sharp poke of a needle

Body Sentences

(Answers will vary.)

Teaching Tip

Remind students that narratives bring stories to life. Adding sensory details will help readers feel like they are part of the story.

Writing the Ending Sentence

Write your ending sentence.

Try these ending strategies. Then choose one or combine two to create your ending sentence. Make a copy of this Google doc or download a Word template.

  • Show how the story ends.

    He said, “It’s your lucky day. That’s a shark’s tooth!”

    (Answers will vary.)

  • Tell readers what you learned.

    The best surprises are shared with someone else.

    (Answers will vary.)

  • Share your feelings.

    It made me happy to spend time with my dad.

    (Answers will vary.)

Ending Sentence

(Answers will vary.)

Read a Narrative Paragraph Draft

Note how the writer put the parts together.

Listen to "My Seashell Surprise"

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My Seashell Surprise

Topic SentenceMy first seashell hunt had a surprise ending. Early one morning my dad and I walked to the beach with a red bucket. The sand was soft and cool. Body SentencesWe collected orange, white, and brown shells of all different shapes and sizes. When our bucket was almost filled, I spotted something black and shiny pointing out of the sand. I reached down and grabbed the object right before a wave crashed against my legs. The object felt sharp and curvy. Finally, I opened my hand. “What is this?” I asked my dad. Ending SentencesHe said, “It’s your lucky day. That’s a shark’s tooth!”

Teaching Tip

Students will recognize many parts of this paragraph, such as the topic sentence, body sentences, and ending sentence. Help them see the choices the writer has made in drafting.

This lesson is a part of the Writing Narrative Paragraphs unit.

Click the title to view more information about this unit and a full list of lessons that are included.

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