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Teacher Tips and Answers
Shakespeare

Writing Statements

All sentences must include a subject and a verb and express a complete thought.

Shea directed a play.

      (The subject is Shea—what the sentence is about. The verb is directed—what Shea did.)

Sentences serve different functions: statements, questions, commands, and conditionals.

Statements are sometimes called declarative sentences because they declare information about a person, a place, a thing, or an idea. Statements are the most common kind of sentence, and they end with periods.

The cast recited their lines.

When the rehearsal ended, Shea complimented the cast.

Find subjects and verbs.

Read each sentence. Write down its subject and verb. Make a copy of this Google doc.

  1. The cast rehearsed a Shakespearean play.

    Subject?

    cast

    Verb?

    rehearsed

  2. Raj performed the role of King Lear.

    Subject?

    Raj

    Verb?

    performed

  3. Opening night is just two days away.

    Subject?

    night

    Verb?

    is

  4. Will you attend?

    Subject?

    you

    Verb?

    will attend

  5. Crew members work tirelessly on the set.

    Subject?

    members

    Verb?

    work

  6. The stage looks fantastic.

    Subject?

    stage

    Verb?

    looks

  7. In a corner behind the stage, Zoe recited her monologue.

    Subject?

    Zoe

    Verb?

    recited

  8. Did you forget your costume?

    Subject?

    you

    Verb?

    did forget

  9. Everyone is excited to perform.

    Subject?

    Everyone

    Verb?

    is

  10. Lights shine on Gabriel's face.

    Subject?

    Lights

    Verb?

    shine

Make statements.

Think about a plan of yours that didn't work out the way you wanted. Now imagine that you are a politician answering pointed questions about your plan. For each question below, write a true statement that nonetheless puts the best spin on what happened. Make a copy of this Google doc.

Interview
  1. Could you please provide us with a statement about what your plan was initially?

    (Answers will vary.) I planned to impress my crush by taking her skating at the roller rink.

  2. How did your plan turn out?

    (Answers will vary.) I did in fact take my crush skating at Wheelz, so in that sense, it was a success.

  3. What went wrong with your plan?

    (Answers will vary.) There was a problem with the roller skates.

  4. Can you be more specific about the problem?

    (Answers will vary.) The wheels on the skates spun very rapidly.

  5. What resulted from this problem?

    (Answers will vary.) Apparently, a person wearing skates with rapidly spinning wheels needs to have a certain amount of skill in order to stay upright.

  6. Where do you think you went wrong?

    (Answers will vary.) I have yet to attain the skill.

  7. Can you describe the negative outcomes you experienced?

    (Answers will vary.) I experienced a series of setbacks to my backside and my self-esteem.

  8. Who witnessed these negative outcomes?

    (Answers will vary.) I provided entertainment to all of the patrons of Wheelz, most specifically my crush.

  9. How did the witness(es) respond to the situation?

    (Answers will vary.) My crush turned out to be an excellent skater and circled the rink beside me, holding my hand the whole time.

  10. What plans do you have for the future?

    (Answers will vary.) I plan to find out something else that she is good at that she can teach me.

Face a fear.

Write four statements about a time you faced a fear. What was the fearful thing or moment? How did you react? What was the outcome? What did you learn? Make sure you use complete sentences.

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